Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism, Letters, Drama and Music

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The 96th annual Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism, Letters, Drama and Music, awarded on the recommendation of the Pulitzer Prize Board, were announced on April 16 by Columbia University.
The winners in each category:
A. PRIZES IN JOURNALISM
1. PUBLIC SERVICE
For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal.
Awarded to The Philadelphia Inquirer for its exploration of pervasive violence in the city’s schools, using powerful print narratives and videos to illuminate crimes committed by children against children and to stir reforms to improve safety for teachers and students.
2. BREAKING NEWS REPORTING
For a distinguished example of local reporting of breaking news that, as quickly as possible, captures events accurately as they occur, and, as time passes, illuminates, provides context and expands upon the initial coverage, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
The Tuscaloosa (Ala.) News Staff, for its enterprising coverage of a deadly tornado, using social media as well as traditional reporting to provide real-time updates, help locate missing people and produce in-depth print accounts even after power disruption forced the paper to publish at another plant 50 miles away.
3. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING
For a distinguished example of investigative reporting, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Two Prizes of $10,000 each:
Awarded to Matt Apuzzo, Adam Goldman, Eileen Sullivan and Chris Hawley of the Associated Press for their spotlighting of the New York Police Department’s clandestine spying program that monitored daily life in Muslim communities, resulting in congressional calls for a federal investigation, and a debate over the proper role of domestic intelligence gathering.
Awarded to Michael J. Berens and Ken Armstrong of The Seattle Times for their investigation of how a little known governmental body in Washington State moved vulnerable patients from safer pain-control medication to methadone, a cheaper but more dangerous drug, coverage that prompted statewide health warnings.
4. EXPLANATORY REPORTING
For a distinguished example of explanatory reporting that illuminates a significant and complex subject, demonstrating mastery of the subject, lucid writing and clear presentation, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to David Kocieniewski of The New York Times for his lucid series that penetrated a legal thicket to explain how the nation’s wealthiest citizens and corporations often exploited loopholes and avoided taxes.
5. LOCAL REPORTING
For a distinguished example of reporting on significant issues of local concern, demonstrating originality and community expertise, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Sara Ganim and members of The Patriot-News Staff, Harrisburg, Penn., for courageously revealing and adeptly covering the explosive Penn State sex scandal involving former football coach Jerry Sandusky.
6. NATIONAL REPORTING
For a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to David Wood of The Huffington Post for his riveting exploration of the physical and emotional challenges facing American soldiers severely wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan during a decade of war.
7. INTERNATIONAL REPORTING
For a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Jeffrey Gettleman of The New York Times for his vivid reports, often at personal peril, on famine and conflict in East Africa, a neglected but increasingly strategic part of the world.
8. FEATURE WRITING
For a distinguished example of feature writing giving prime consideration to quality of writing, originality and concision, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Eli Sanders of The Stranger, a Seattle (Wash.) weekly, for his haunting story of a woman who survived a brutal attack that took the life of her partner, using the woman’s brave courtroom testimony and the details of the crime to construct a moving narrative.
9. COMMENTARY
For distinguished commentary, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Mary Schmich of the Chicago Tribune for her wide range of down-to-earth columns that reflect the character and capture the culture of her famed city.
Also nominated as finalists in this category were: Nicholas Kristof of The New York Times for his valorous columns that transport readers into dangerous international scenes, from Egypt to Kenya to Cambodia, often focusing on the disenfranchised and always providing insight, and Steve Lopez of the Los Angeles Times for his engaging commentary on death and dying, marked by pieces on his own father’s rapid physical and mental decline, that stir readers to address end-of-life questions.
10. CRITICISM
For distinguished criticism, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Wesley Morris of The Boston Globe for his smart, inventive film criticism, distinguished by pinpoint prose and an easy traverse between the art house and the big-screen box office.
11. EDITORIAL WRITING
For distinguished editorial writing, the test of excellence being clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
No Award
12. EDITORIAL CARTOONING
For a distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing and pictorial effect, published as a still drawing, animation or both, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Matt Wuerker of POLITICO for his consistently fresh, funny cartoons, especially memorable for lampooning the partisan conflict that engulfed Washington.
13. BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY
For a distinguished example of breaking news photography in black and white or color, which may consist of a photograph or photographs, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Massoud Hossaini of Agence France-Presse for his heartbreaking image of a girl crying in fear after a suicide bomber’s attack at a crowded shrine in Kabul.
14. FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
For a distinguished example of feature photography in black and white or color, which may consist of a photograph or photographs, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Craig F. Walker of The Denver Post, for his compassionate chronicle of an honorably discharged veteran, home from Iraq and struggling with a severe case of post-traumatic stress, images that enable viewers to better grasp a national issue.
B. LETTERS AND DRAMA PRIZES
1. FICTION
For distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
No Award
2. DRAMA
For a distinguished play by an American author, preferably original in its source and dealing with American life, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to “Water by the Spoonful,” by Quiara Alegría Hudes, an imaginative play about the search for meaning by a returning Iraq war veteran working in a sandwich shop in his hometown of Philadelphia.
3. HISTORY
For a distinguished and appropriately documented book on the history of the United States, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to “Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention,” by the late Manning Marable (Viking), an exploration of the legendary life and provocative views of one of the most significant African-Americans in U.S. history, a work that separates fact from fiction and blends the heroic and tragic. (Moved by the Board from the Biography category.)
4. BIOGRAPHY
For a distinguished and appropriately documented biography or autobiography by an American author, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to “George F. Kennan: An American Life,” by John Lewis Gaddis (The Penguin Press), an engaging portrait of a globetrotting diplomat whose complicated life was interwoven with the Cold War and America’s emergence as the world’s dominant power.
5. POETRY
For a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to “Life on Mars,” by Tracy K. Smith (Graywolf Press), a collection of bold, skillful poems, taking readers into the universe and moving them to an authentic mix of joy and pain.
6. GENERAL NONFICTION
For a distinguished and appropriately documented book of nonfiction by an American author that is not eligible for consideration in any other category, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to “The Swerve: How the World Became Modern,” by Stephen Greenblatt (W.W. Norton and Company), a provocative book arguing that an obscure work of philosophy, discovered nearly 600 years ago, changed the course of history by anticipating the science and sensibilities of today.
C. PRIZE IN MUSIC
For distinguished musical composition by an American that has had its first performance or recording in the United States during the year, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
Awarded to Kevin Puts for “Silent Night: Opera in Two Acts,” commissioned and premiered by the Minnesota Opera in Minneapolis on November 12, 2011, a stirring opera that recounts the true story of a spontaneous cease-fire among Scottish, French and Germans during World War I, displaying versatility of style and cutting straight to the heart. Libretto by Mark Campbell (Aperto Press).
Source of information: http://www.pulitzer.org/awards/2012